Texas Instruments TI99/4a

The Texas Instruments TI-99/4A followed the TI99/4, which was let down by a poor keyboard, and was released in 1981. Based on the TMS9900 microprocessor, the TI99/4 was the first 16-bit home computer.

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Epson P40 Thermal Printer

The Epson P-40 is compact portable uni-directional thermal dot matrix printer which operates on NiCd batteries. It features various print modes including two bit image modes and character sets for 9 countries. It also has the ASCII 95 character set. It has a speed of 45cps for normal characters and 22.5 cps for enlarged characters.…

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Hewlett Packard HP 95LX

The HP 95LX was launched on April 23, 1991 before the term personal digital assistant, or PDA, found its way into everyday use putting the power of a computer into the palm of your hand. It ran MS-DOS v3.22 in 512K bytes of RAM and 1M-byte ROM and had a QWERTY keyboard and a separate…

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Apple Pascal on Apple IIe

Apple IIe flopty drie and Apple Pascal diskettes

Back In August I took delivery of a boxed Apple IIe in excellent working condition. I had used an earlier Apple II at university in 1982/83 to learn Pascal and hoped to find a set of Pascal diskettes which I duly did a couple of weeks later. I didn’t want to try and do too…

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Tandy WP-3 Word Processor

The Tandy WP-3 is a portable Word Processor from the lates 1980s, early 1990s, a successor to the Tandy WP-2 but with a British English dictionary. Based on the Z-80 compatible NEC 70008A-6 it had a 6 line LCD display and a very usable full-size keyboard. Powered by 6V main supply and/or 4 x AA battries with backup from a CR2340 cell.

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Sharp PC 3000

Sharp PC-3000 DOS Handheld

The PC-3000 was a DOS-based computer, the predecessor to the PC-3100, launched in 1991 following the release of the Atari Portfolio, the world’s first palmtop computer.

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Texas Instruments TI Programmable 57

Texas Instruments TI Programmable 57

The TI-57 was a programmable calculator made by Texas Instruments from 1977 to 1982, which was followed by the more powerful TI-58 and TI-59. It had 50 program steps and 8 memory registers. I owned a Texas Instruments TI-57 while at university, used very occasionally for ‘real’ problems but mainly just played with the examples…

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